Last edited by Mashicage
Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

2 edition of The influenza viruses found in the catalog.

The influenza viruses

Leslie Hoyle

The influenza viruses

by Leslie Hoyle

  • 281 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Springer-Verlag New York in [New York] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Influenza viruses.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 268-375.

    Statementby L. Hoyle.
    SeriesVirology monographs,, 4
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQR360 .V52 no. 4
    The Physical Object
    Pagination375 p.
    Number of Pages375
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5628633M
    LC Control Number68054069

    The Influenza Viruses. [Robert M Krug] -- Influenza virus is an important human pathogen, frequently causing widespread disease and a significant loss of life. A major focus of this book is the molecular biology of influenza virus. The first chapter, which serves as an introduction, describes the structure of each of the genomic RNA.   FLU. The Story of the Great Influenza Pandemic of and the Search. for the Virus That Caused It. By Gina Kolata. Illustrated. pp. New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux. $

    Influenza viruses are single-stranded RNA orthomyxoviruses. They are classified antigenically as types A, B, C or D. Generally, only influenza A and B cause severe disease in humans. Surface glycoprotein antigens. Influenza viruses have 2 surface glycoprotein antigens: haemagglutinin (H), which is involved in cell attachment during infection. Influenza is a quick, interesting read on the history of the flu, where we are today in our fight against it, and how prepared we are should an epidemic strike in the future. I always enjoy a medical science book, and this one's no different. I come away from this having learned so much about this common disease that has killed countless throughout history and continues to do so today.4/5().

    This virus has a genome of seven segments and presented approximately 50% overall homology with influenza C virus (ICV). Antigenic characterization using rabbit polyclonal sera on 10 IDVs from the United States suggested these IDVs can be grouped to two distinct antigenic groups (D/swine/Oklahoma// [D/OK]-like and D/bovine/Oklahoma/ Author: Alessandra Falchi. The flu pandemic first reached Europe in from the Ottoman Empire along trade and shipping routes connected to Constantinople, brought to Asia Minor by infected travelers from the Middle East. At the time, the Ottoman Empire's territory included most of the Balkans and Bulgaria. This gave influenza unrestricted access to Athens, Sofia, and Sarajevo as it spread throughout the empire.


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The influenza viruses by Leslie Hoyle Download PDF EPUB FB2

When writing a book about an event you of course want back story and a summary of events leading up to the main topic. However for a book about the Influenza pandemic to spend about 80 pages in the 19th century to me seems an unnecessary by:   Although other books have guided readers through the pandemic, The Great Influenza places this tiny lethal virus within a context of international, social, and medical history.

Barry offers lucid (if at times complicated) biological and chemical explanations for The influenza viruses book infection and spread of the influenza virus/5(K). When The Great Influenza first came out, I got a copy from Bill Foege, a good friend and public-health hero who helped to eradicate smallpox.

I’m glad I read it. I’m glad I read it. It’s one of several books that made it clear to me that the world needed to do a better job of preparing for novel pathogens. The subtitle, "The Story of the Great Influenza Pandemic of and the Search for the Virus that Caused It" doesn't just promise the flu ofbut it indicates that it will get SOME face time.

It just doesn't get as much as emo poetry writing scienti This book was, all in The influenza viruses book, a disappointment/5. The Great Influenza by John Barry is an important book that is equal part history and equal part science discussing the Flu. The book is written almost exclusively about the American impacts towards and from the flu.4/5(K).

Influenza B viruses generally change more slowly in terms of their genetic and antigenic properties than influenza A viruses, especially influenza A(H3N2) viruses.

Influenza surveillance data from recent years shows co-circulation of influenza B viruses from both lineages in the United States and around the world. In "Flu" she does a fine job of reporting on the great influenza pandemic ofand on the search for the virus that caused twenty to a hundred million deaths: "The epidemic affected the course of history and was a terrifying presence at the end of World War I, killing more Americans in a single year than died in battle in World War I Cited by:   Dr.

Jeremy Brown’s book is a very intelligent and well researched book of one of the deadliest diseases, influenza. He provides a compelling history of the fight against the flu and explains in layman’s terms medical and scientific issues/5(35).

Influenza — also known as the flu — is a contagious viral infection that attacks your respiratory system. Influenza viruses that infect humans Author: Kiara Anthony. Influenza virus infection requires binding of the HA protein to sialic acid receptors on the host cell surface.

The HA receptor binding site consists of a subset of amino acids that are invariant in all avian HAs, but vary in mammalian-adapted HAs. Human-adapted influenza viruses preferentially bind sialic acid receptors with α() by: 6. Weekly U.S. Influenza Surveillance Report Friday, Aug ; Influenza Antiviral Medications: Summary for Clinicians Monday, Aug ; Information for Health Care Professionals Flu Season Monday, August 3, The influenza pandemic was the most severe pandemic in recent history.

It was caused by an H1N1 virus with genes of avian origin. Although there is not universal consensus regarding where the virus originated, it spread worldwide during   Influenza A viruses also are found in many different animals, including ducks, chickens, pigs, whales, horses and seals.

Antigenic Characterization of Influenza Viruses “Antigens” are molecular structures on the surface of viruses that are recognized by the immune system and are capable of triggering an immune response (antibody production). Online shopping from a great selection at Books Store. The Spanish Flu: History of The Great Influenza of Analogies and Differences with The World Pandemic of and How to Prevent New Pandemics with Lessons to Remember from The Deadliest Plague.

L.E. Davis, in Encyclopedia of the Neurological Sciences (Second Edition), Introduction. Influenza virus is a member of the Orthomyxoviridae family and contains ribonucleic acid (RNA) as its nucleic acid.

Influenza A and B viruses are the major viruses that are highly contagious to humans and cause acute respiratory disease. “Influenza by Dr. Jeremy Brown vividly reminds us that the flu has been one of the great ravages of our time. Read this important and comprehensive book to learn what happened a century ago, and how we continue to try and overcome this ever-present and mutating killer.” —Sandeep Jauhar, New York Times bestselling author of Heart: A HistoryReleased on: Octo Influenza, commonly known as "the flu", is an infectious disease caused by an influenza virus.

Symptoms can be mild to severe. The most common symptoms include: high fever, runny nose, sore throat, muscle and joint pain, headache, coughing, and feeling tired.

These symptoms typically begin two days after exposure to the virus and most last less than a : Influenza viruses. The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Plague in History (originally subtitled The Epic Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History) is a nonfiction book by John M. Barry that examines the flu pandemic, the worst pandemic in focuses on what was occurring in the United States at the time and attempts to place it against the background of American history and.

Influenza virus is an important human pathogen, frequently causing widespread disease and a significant loss of life. Much has been learned about the structure of the virus, its genetic variation, its mode of gene expression and replication, and its interaction with the host immu­ nologic : Springer US.

Influenza A virus causes influenza in birds and some mammals, and is the only species of the genus Alphainfluenzavirus of the virus family Orthomyxoviridae.

Strains of all subtypes of influenza A virus have been isolated from wild birds, although disease is uncommon. Some isolates of influenza A virus cause severe disease both in domestic poultry and, rarely, in : Insthoviricetes.

This knowledge has the potential of leading to ap­ proaches for the control of influenza virus. In addition, research on influ­ enza virus has led to important advances in eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology and in immunology.

A major focus of this book is the molecular biology of influenza virus. Barry Gewen reviews following books: The Great Influenza: The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague in History by John M Barry; and Microbial Threats .The strongest weapon against pandemic is the truth.

Read why in the definitive account of the Flu Epidemic. Magisterial in its breadth of perspective and depth of research, The Great Influenza provides us with a precise and sobering model as we confront the epidemics looming on our own horizon. As Barry concludes, "The final lesson of